Intel Core 2 Extreme QX9770 Performance Preview

Thirty million transistors on the head of a pin.  Think about that for a minute.  Where on earth can you fit 30 million of anything in that amount of space?  It used to be that 30 million transistors was a good-sized chip.  These days, in a 45nm Hafnium-based High-K process, it almost seems like we (OK, OK, Intel...) can defy the laws of physics.  We're talking rocket science here people. Actually, it's probably a bit more complex than rocket science.  Titanium (Ti), Zirconium (Zr), Gallium (Ga), heck we've even heard of Rubidium...

Intel Officially Launches 45nm Penryn Family

Over the course of the past few months, we've brought you detailed analysis on Intel's forward-looking products based on their 45nm Penryn core architecture.  At the time, these products were not officially launched in the various sales channels.  Today Intel has announced official full availability of a number of new processors based on their bleeding-edge 45nm High-k metal gate silicon process technology that offers both lower power consumption and higher clock speeds... INTEL’S FUNDAMENTAL ADVANCE IN TRANSISTOR DESIGN EXTENDS...

Intel Core 2 Extreme QX9650 - Yorkfield Has Landed

It seems like Intel started talking about the Penryn core as soon as the Conroe core launched in the form of the first Core 2 Duo and Core 2 Extreme processors.  Penryn was to be the next evolution in Intel’s Core microarchitecture and would be the foundation of a new class of mobile, desktop, and server processor built using the company’s advanced 45nm manufacturing process. Penryn wouldn’t be a straight die-shrink of Conroe, however.  With Penryn, Intel planned to introduce new SSE4 instructions, increase the amount of L2 cache per core, reduce power consumption, and generally enhance...

IDF Day 2: Mobility, Silverthorne, Moorestown

Day 2 at this year’s IDF began with a mobility keynote hosted by Intel’s David “Dadi” Perlmutter and Anand Chandrasekher.  The keynote was broken up into two parts; the first focused on notebooks and Intel’s mobile platforms as a whole and the second focused on “ultra mobility” featuring a number of UMPCs and MIDs....

Intel Skulltrail and Penryn Performance Preview

During a closed door session at IDF, we had a chance to get some hands on time with a few upcoming Intel platforms including Skulltrail, the octa-core platform Intel is targeting at enthusiasts.  We also saw some dual-core 45nm desktop and mobile (Wolfdale) machines at work and even snapped off a few pics of a phase-change cooled, overclocked Skulltrail machine that was running at 4GHz.       Representatives from Intel wanted to get the point across that Wolfdale is going to be a very power friendly product and showed off a system...

IDF Showcase: NVIDIA, Corsair, X38 and More

There were a multitude of products on display on the show floor at the Intel Developers Forum this year, most of which were designed for the enterprise space.  In addition to the plethora of servers on display, however, were products from a number of manufactures that are well known to enthusiasts.  We stopped by a few of their booths and snapped off some pictures to give you all an idea as to what was on display.         One...

IDF Day 1: Gordon Moore, Gelsinger's Keynote

Midway through the first day at IDF, there was an interview held with Gordon Moore, the retired Chairman, CEO and co-founder of Intel Corporation, in which he spoke of the early years at the company and the many hurdles they faced in the beginning.         Gordon talked about the invention of the integrated circuit and how Intel’s faced fierce competition from Asian semiconductor manufactures...

IDF Day 1: Paul Otellini's Keynote

This year’s Intel Developer Forum began with a brief overview of the event given by Pat Gelsinger, Senior Vice President and General Manager of Intel’s Digital Enterprise Group.  Pat spoke briefly about this year being the 10th Anniversary of IDF and talked about the many speakers and partners that will contribute to the event.         After Mr. Gelsinger was done, he introduced Paul Otellini, Intel’s President.  Paul began with talk of "extremes" and how today’s cutting-edge technology will be tomorrow’s...

AMD Barcelona Architecture Launch: Native Quad-Core

It has been quite a while since AMD launched a truly new CPU core architecture.  It was way back in September of 2003 that the first "K8" based desktop processors arrived in the form of the single-core Athlon 64 and Athlon 64-FX.  And while the company has launched a slew of new desktop, server, and mobile processors since then, there haven’t been any major changes made to the base CPU architecture.   AMD did make some modifications to the execution core as they introduced processors for different sockets or with different L2 cache sizes, but overall the architecture remained largely unchanged....

AMD Consumer Electronics Event in NYC

AMD hosted a small gathering in the Penthouse at the SoHo Grand Hotel in New York City yesterday (yes, the same place that Lindsey Lohan had her meltdown a few weeks ago), to showcase some of their existing products and technologies, to show off a few products built by their partners, and to demo some products due to be released in the coming months.  We attended the event and snapped some photos of the various demo stations and thought we'd share them with you here. We're sure many of you have already seen some of the items that were on display, but we were able to get a bit more up close...

Intel Core 2 Extreme QX6850

What goes faster than a Core 2 Quad processor at 3GHz?  Unfortunately, or fortunately depending on your perspective, nothing from AMD at the moment.  Thankfully Intel has a few more "MHz in the can", or so to speak.  Actually, it appears they may have a lot more, as you'll see in the pages that follow.  Let's not get too far ahead of ourselves though.  First, Intel had to lay the platform foundation to support higher performance.  After all, a faster engine is no good to you, sitting idle. The introduction of the Intel P35 "Bearlake" chipset and soon-to-be-released X38 chipset...

Intel Core 2 Duo E6750 Performance And Overclocking

Over the last year or so, since Intel's Core microarchitecture and Conroe core were ready to be unveiled at the Intel Developers Forum in early March '06, Intel has been more open and has allowed the media a view into more details regarding upcoming products much earlier than they had before.  You don't have to take our word for it, however.  Simply look around at all of the early performance previews out of IDF, and the steady flow of announcements regarding Intel's 45nm manufacturing process, metal gate transistors, the Terascale project, Larrabee, Penryn, Nehalem, and a number of other projects,...

Intel V8 Media Creation Platform - Dual Sockets - Dual Xeons

It was at this year's Consumer Electronics Show that we were first exposed to an Intel demo machine dubbed the ' V8' .  Intel wouldn't label the machine as a direct response to the QuadFX platform by AMD, but they did want to stress the point that enthusiasts could have a dual-socket, eight-core Intel powered machine today if they went with a workstation platform.  At the heart of the 'V8' machine were two quad-core Xeon processors, a dual-socket S5000XVN motherboard powered by the Intel 5000X-series chipset, and 4GB of RAM.  No doubt a powerful system.  But there was only so...

AMD Athlon X2 BE-2350 and BE-2300 "Brisbane" Processors

Although they're hard at work on Barcelona and plan to release a new high-end, native quad-core CPU in the coming months, AMD has turned a good part of their attention to a different segment of the market, the low power segment.  Back in August of 2006, AMD released several low power CPUs that aimed to balance performance and power consumption.  One was the 'Windsor' based Athlon 64 X2 4600+ with a TDP of 65w and the other was the Athlon 64 X2 3800+ which had a low TDP of 35w.  While the processors were impressive from an efficiency standpoint, AMD struggled to keep up with demand and also offered...

Intel Pentium E2140 Dual Core Processor

Intel has spent millions making their "Core" brand synonymous with high performance processing. In these days of the Core Duo, Core 2 Duo, Core 2 Quad, and Core 2 Extreme, it’s pretty easy to find a Core microarchitecture-based processor to match nearly any possible price point. The performance levels of the Core 2 product lineup have been so dominating that Intel really didn’t have to spend a penny if they didn’t want to, although big time marketing campaigns are good for converting those who just want the latest and greatest and don’t necessarily read enthusiast sites like ours here. Despite...

Intel Wolfdale and Yorkfield Performance (Penryn)

A little over a year ago at the Intel Developers forum in San Francisco, Intel allowed a small group of members of the technology press to run benchmarks on a pre-configured Conroe-based system, well before processors based on the Conroe core had begun to ship. This was a new strategy for Intel, but a welcomed one in our opinion as it gave enthusiasts a chance to glean some real information about an upcoming product well before it actually hit store shelves.  Intel continued to employ this strategy in the weeks leading up to the launch of the Kentsfield core. Once again, in...

Intel Core 2 Extreme QX6800

Hot on the heals of the holiday weekend, Intel is launching a new flagship quad-core processor targeted at hardcore power users and PC enthusiasts. As its name implies, the new Core 2 Extreme QX6800 has frequency parity with its dual-core counterpart, the Core 2 Extreme X6800 - sans the "Q". At 2.93GHz this makes the Core 2 Extreme QX6800 Intel's highest clocked quad-core desktop processor to date. Other than its higher frequency though, the Core 2 Extreme QX6800 doesn't differ from Intel's previous high-end quad-core processor, the 2.66GHz Core 2 Extreme QX6700, in any way. But what...

Intel Penryn and Nehalem Details Emerge

Intel held a briefing today to further disclose and discuss details regarding their upcoming 45nm High-K Penryn and Nehalem processor cores.  Roughly two years ago, Intel talked about their proposed "tick-tock" product strategy which entailed the shift to a new process technology followed by an enhanced or entirely new microarchitecture approximately every year. Today we have more details regarding 2007's "tick", the Penryn core, and next year's "tock", the Nehalem core, which also ushers in significant changes to Intel's platform architecture...

Intel VIIV vs. AMD LIVE!

Without question, the process of choosing a standard, pre-built PC or building one yourself has become almost trivial over the last few years. Given the caliber of hardware on the market, even with just a little bit of knowledge, it is difficult to purchase a system today which would not be suitable for nearly any standard application. Granted, there are certain constraints when choosing a system that will be specifically aimed at a given application. For example, when selecting a gaming PC consumers clearly must devote a great deal of attention towards processor speed and the graphics card....

AMD Athlon 64 X2 6000+

AMD has been fairly quiet as of late. A few months ago, we took a look at their initial Quad-FX platform and FX-70 series offerings.  However, on the mainstream socket AM2 front, AMD hasn't made any real noise since the release of the Athlon 64 FX-62 way back in May of 2006. That's not to say AMD hasn't released any products since then. In fact, the company has launched a plethora of lower-clocked "Energy Efficient" processors for the platform and replaced the 125W Athlon 64 FX-62 with an 89W X2 5600+ at the same 2.8GHz and cache size. Frankly, enthusiasts waiting...

AMD Athlon 64 X2 65nm Brisbane-Core

  At the end of 2006, AMD announced the availability of processors built using the company's 65nm manufacturing process, which is first being implemented with the Athlon 64 X2 product line. The move to 65nm brings a number of advantages for both AMD and consumers. From AMD's standpoint, the more advanced manufacturing process allows for more processors to be produced per wafer, therefore improving manufacturing efficiency and in turn profit margins. Ultimately, the aim is to let this savings trickle down into retail channels, lowering AMD's costs and potentially the cost of...

Intel 45nm Fab Process And Penryn Preview

Intel's impressive manufacturing process capabilities and fab resources are well known throughout the industry. In fact, most would argue that their manufacturing prowess has played a large part in the company's success. They've had many "firsts" over the years due to process advancements, the most recent of which was their successful cross-over from 90nm to 65nm mass production.  Due to that success Intel has already shipped millions of processors manufactured at 65nm. Today, Intel is announcing a breakthrough that will affect future products scheduled to be...

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