Items tagged with Email

The growing consensus is that the U.S. government is overstepping its bounds and trampling on people's right to privacy. Former NSA contractor Edward Snowden blew the whistle on the government's vast spying program, and while that was an eye opener for the country (and world) at large, the full extent of its efforts are still coming to light. The most recent example is the email scanner Yahoo built under the direction of the NSA and FBI.Developed in secret, the email scanner was found to be a sophisticated hacking tool, or rootkit, as some experts have classified it. The email scanner gave the U.S. government the ability to spy on millions of Yahoo Mail users without their knowledge or consent.... Read more...
We've no doubt all been there: we click the "Send" button on an email, and before we realize what just happened, it's too late. That email and its potential embarrassment is out of your hands. While it's one thing to accidentally send an email too early, or reply all when you shouldn't have, it's an entirely different story when you accidentally email up to 1.2 million people at once. Oh - and if that's not bad enough, imagine taking down an entire email system as a result! That's just what happened to the National Health Service in the UK, as an IT contractor sent a test email to the agency's 1.2 million employees - something that didn't go unnoticed. If you've ever been involved in an... Read more...
Ahmed Mehtab, a student from Pakistan and the CEO of Security Fuse, is in the running to score a $20,000 payday from Google's bug bounty program. While there remains some red tape to clear, Mehtab is likely to receive the bounty for discovering a rather crafty flaw in Gmail relating to its authentication and verification system, one that could make it possible for a remote hacker to hijack a Gmail account. The vulnerability lies in how Google handles multiple Gmail accounts. A user who has more than one Gmail address can link them and have the primary Gmail account forward email to secondary accounts. If a specific set of conditions exist, it them becomes possible to hijack an email account belonging... Read more...
There are many different ways of hacking into a person's email account. Some are rather sophisticated and involve a lot of effort, while on the end of the spectrum a scheme known as phishing is one of the easiest methods—all you need is a cooperative victim with limited technical savvy. Hackers found both in John Podesta, Chairman of the Hillary Clinton presidential campaign.What is even more startling is that hackers found the same in Clinton's IT staff. It now appears that it was not some complex hacking that compromised the security of Podesta's email account, it was the inability to recognize a phishing attempt despite multiple telltale signs.WikiLeaks has been making public hacked emails... Read more...
Less than two weeks before U.S. elections kick off on November 8th, the FBI has released a new bombshell that threatens to shakeup what has already been an almost circus-like campaign season. FBI Director James Comey, who is known more widely in the circles for his staunch criticism of Apple in the San Bernardino iPhone encryption case, just sent a letter to Congress informing them that there have been newly uncovered emails that are pertinent to the department’s investigation of Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton’s personal email server. "In connection with an unrelated case, the FBI has learned of the existence of emails that appear to be pertinent to the investigation,” wrote... Read more...
Yahoo has turned back on the automatic forwarding feature for Yahoo Mail users after previously disabling the function as part of what the firm claimed was planned maintenance. It's sticking with that explanation, saying the temporary disruption was part of a broader upgrade to its email service that's been taking place over the course of the year.Image Source: Flickr (Rodrigo Paoletti) "Last week, we temporarily disabled the ability to add new automatic forwarding in Yahoo Mail. As of today, auto-forward is enabled again for all Mail users," said Michael Albers, VP of Product Management, Yahoo Mail. "We apologize for the interruption.""Why the pause? Over the past year, Yahoo Mail has been upgrading... Read more...
It's been a long time since I've read Dale Carnegie's "How to Win Friends and Influence People" but I'm pretty sure there isn't a chapter on holding people hostage. That's generally a bad idea, and so is Yahoo's decision to disable the forwarding feature for its email service, which effectively prevents Yahoo Mail users from hightailing it out of there with a note left behind for anyone that comes looking. As one Yahoo Mail user told the Associated Press, the timing here is "extremely suspicious." I don't disagree with that observation. Apparently Yahoo flipped the switch on its forward feature at the beginning of the month, and while it doesn't seem to affect users who had already set up forwarding,... Read more...
"Yahoo" is a positive word, but in relation to the internet giant, it's starting to feel like it could describe some of the company's key management. Yahoo has been dealing with some troubling issues, but most of those issues were self-created, such as failing to disclose a security breach which took place years ago, and building a custom tool for the U.S. government - and the NSA in particular - to scan user emails. Now, it's being reported that Yahoo's tool is in effect a sophisticated "hacking tool", although it's supposedly not that much different from Yahoo's preexisting tools used to seek out malware, child pornography, and spam. "Tool" might be the wrong word, though, as some experts... Read more...
In the wake of a report outing Yahoo's email scanning program for the government, a handful of other major tech firms have gone on record saying they don't snoop your incoming messages for Uncle Sam. Those firms include Apple, Facebook, Google, Microsoft, and Twitter, four of which pretty much denied ever receiving such a request from the U.S. government. "We’ve never received a request like this, and were we to receive it we’d challenge it in a court. Separately, while federal law prohibits companies from being able to share information about certain types of national security related requests, we are currently suing the Justice Department for the ability to disclose more information about government... Read more...
The Internet is littered with memes describing awkward moments and perhaps now someone will make a new one describing that awkward moment when a service that prides itself on anonymity mistakenly shares your email address without thousands of others. So it goes with Glassdoor, an online portal where employees past and present can leave anonymous reviews of companies.Glassdoor is a popular and handy website for any job seeker considering employment at a particular firm. It's filled with useful information, a lot of it anecdotal in terms of being user reviews, but also what kind of compensation to expect for various roles within an organization. If you're about to negotiate your salary or find... Read more...
It's good computing practice to change your passwords every now and then, and also after a major hacking incident. The latter is why you should considering changing your Gmail or Yahoo password at your earliest convenience—over 272 million online accounts have been stolen and are being traded in Russia's underground market. Researchers from Hold Security told Reuters that it found a Russian hacker gloating in a web forum that he had stolen a larger number of online credentials. His cache of compromised accounts totaled 1.17 billion, though many of them were duplicates. After eliminating redundant entries, the security outfit counted 57 million Mail.ru accounts, just 7 million shy of the monthly... Read more...
Last week, we learned about the company teaming up with others, such as Microsoft and Yahoo, to make SMTP 'Strict Transport Security' a reality, a protocol that would make it even harder for malicious users to gain access to our email. In a new blog post, the company draws our attention to SMTP STS as well as a couple of other recent (and not so recent) ways the company has improved our security. On Safer Internet Day, which happened a month-and-a-half ago, the company introduced a new Gmail feature that highlights when email is received or being sent to a domain that doesn't offer encryption. You'll see this as a broken lock inside a compose window or... Read more...
With agencies like the NSA and FBI wanting to peer into our personal communications at will, we have to be proactive about keeping ourselves safe. But what if there's a fault we can't work around and simply have to live with? Unless you're a skilled developer, you have to rely on other to come up with an improved solution. All of us want to stay a step ahead of those who want to intrude on our digital lives, and thankfully, many major companies do too. The latest example is with an improvement of SMTP, an extremely popular email protocol that lets you interact with your email in real-time, unlike POP3 which will download emails before they're displayed. SMTP has a number of benefits, but also... Read more...
Spam is one of a handful of Internet scourges—we all hate it, and to some extent, we all suffer from it. That's one of the reasons why Gmail is so popular. Google's home brewed email service is really good (not perfect) at thwarting spam, and thanks to a new service called Gmailify, you can enjoy the exact same spam protection on your Yahoo! Mail or Hotmail/Outlook.com email address, too. If you use of one of those email services but want the benefits of Gmail (which extend beyond spam protection), Gmailify is the answer. "Gmailify links your existing account to Gmail so that you get all the bells and whistles—spam protection, inbox organization and even Google Now cards based on your mail—without... Read more...
Google's free Gmail service is a constant work in progress that's been steadily improving since it was launched 11 years ago (or 6 years ago, if you don't want to include the 5-year beta period). Not every tweak Google makes is a functional one, and if you spend a lot of time in Gmail, you'll be glad to know that Google's made some visual improvements to its webmail service. First on the list is more themes. Lots more. Gmail themes have been available since 2008, giving users a fun way to dress their accounts, and now there are hundreds more high resolution options, courtesy of photographs taken by fellow Googlers. If you still can't find something you like, Google reminds users that they can... Read more...
Email may not have lived up to early expectations that it would kill off the U.S. Post Office, but it (and online Bill Pay, Dropbox, and the like) certainly put a crimp in the mail carrier’s style. Now, Google is giving email a chance to strike another blow: an upcoming feature will make it easier for you to receive bills in your email inbox and pay them from your email. Image credit (all images): Re/codeGoogle’s Pony Express came to light in a document examined by Re/code. Google seems to be seeking partnerships with companies that mail bills for various businesses -- a move that makes a lot of sense. Google can work with those companies to convert those bills to digital bills that would be... Read more...
We all know that many users have the same, weak password for most of his or her accounts. Plenty of password services have popped up to help us maintain strong, unique passwords, but not everyone is onboard with these programs. Now Yahoo is taking a stab at helping Joe Q. Public with his password problem with “on-demand passwords” and is touting an upcoming end-to-end (e2e) encryption plugin for Yahoo Mail.  The new feature sends a text message to your phone with a unique, strong password whenever you log into your Yahoo account. The idea is that, so long as you have your phone, you don’t have to bother trying to remember your password, and you won’t be using the same password you used... Read more...
Earlier this month, it was discovered that China was using man-in-the-middle (MITM) attacks against Microsoft Outlook and Mozilla Thunderbird email clients, as well as smartphone apps that use IMAP and SMTP protocols. Or did it? A spokesman for the Cyberspace Administration of China (CAC) claims the allegations that Chinese authorities hacked into Outlook are just "groundless slander." "The Chinese government is a staunch defender of the Internet's security, and resolutely opposes any form of cyberattack," the CAC said. Image Source: Flickr (Robert Scoble) Online censorship watchdog GreatFire.org pegged China's government as most likely being responsible, noting that "If our... Read more...
Sony is having a tough time figuring out its true enemy (psst, Sony, it's North Korea!). Following a massive cyberattack that resulted in the theft of data and ultimately led to the company cancelling the Christmas Day debut of "The Interview," a far-fetched comedy involving an assassination attempt North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, Sony has been threatening different people and entities not involved in the attack with lawsuits. Just last week, Sony's legal team reportedly sent a letter to at least three major news agencies demanding that they stop publishing information contained in stolen documents from the cyberattack. Now Sony is targeting Twitter with... Read more...
Sony has unleashed its legal beagles following a massive ransomware attack that resulted in scores of stolen data, including movie scripts, marketing materials, social security numbers and passport information for high profile actors and actresses, and more. However, Sony isn't siccing its legal team on the party responsible for the attack -- not yet, anyway -- and is instead targeting media outlets with demands to stop publishing information contained in stolen documents. At least three news outlets have received a letter from David Boies, an attorney for Sony, Reuters reports. They include The New York Times, The Hollywood Reporter, and Variety. They've each been ordered to nuke the information... Read more...
Microsoft isn't a fan of email bloat, and I think many would fall into the same camp. We're not talking the number of emails here, but rather the clunky and weighty attachments that can come included with some of them. If you're working in an environment where you collaborate often, attachments can become even more cumbersome, especially when you download one and realize the sender re-sent and updated copy later on. Again - clunky, clunky, clunky. To help streamline the entire attachment process, Microsoft has updated its Outlook Web App to allow the sender to attach a file to their OneDrive account, rather than attach it inline. This way, the email will be stored in the cloud, and the sender... Read more...
Microsoft is flat out ignoring a federal court order to provide U.S. prosecutors access to a customer's emails being held on a server in Ireland. For Microsoft, this boils down to a matter of trust with its users, and so long as the case continues to maneuver through the appeals process, the Redmond outfit has no intention of complying with the order. Judge Loretta Preska, chief of the U.S. District Court in Manhattan, ruled back on July 31 that Microsoft was required to hand over the email messages to U.S. prosecutors investigating a criminal case. However, she temporarily suspended the order so that Microsoft could appeal. Prosecutors have since argued that her order was not a "final, appealable... Read more...
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