Items tagged with RAM

It was always a given that DDR5 memory would command a premium over DDR4 kits at the outset, but $2,399.99 for a 32GB package? That's just plain ridiculous. It's also what a recent kit of Corsair Dominator Platinum RGB DDR5-5200 recently sold for on eBay as scalpers continue to make bank on tech items that are in hot demand and short supply. A quick check of Newegg's DDR5 listings shows there are only 22 kits, zero of which are in stock. In contrast, there are thousands of DDR4 memory kits, with several 32GB (2x16GB) packages costing around $90, including some DDR4-3200 kits. There's even a 32GB DDR4-4000 memory kit listed for around $110. At present, 32GB DDR5 kits range in price from around... Read more...
We have only now entered into the era of DDR5 memory with the introduction of Intel's Alder Lake platform pushing us through the door, and it will take some time for the latest memory standard to gain significant traction. That's to say, DDR4 isn't going to disappear from the market in the near future. Nevertheless, Samsung is already looking ahead to what eventually comes next and has an idea of how fast its DDR6 and GDDR7 memory modules will end up being. Sometimes it feels like the pace of technology has only one speed. However, bearing in mind that newfangled products are often developed years in advance, it's understandable that one of the largest chip makers would be talking about memory... Read more...
In computer security, "cracking" systems is all about gaining access where you aren't supposed to have it. One of the most definitive ways to do this is by "pwning"—or "taking control of"—a system's main memory interface. Normally, doing so requires physical access to the system, but security researchers have demonstrated time and again that it's possible to pilfer or modify secure data in DRAM through variations on the "Rowhammer" exploit. For those who aren't familiar, Rowhammer is the general name for a class of exploits that involves performing particular patterns of accesses to specific physical regions of memory in order to trigger unwanted behavior in nearby cells, including... Read more...
Most records are destined to be broken, and make no mistake, that's going to happen at a breakneck pace in DDR5 land once things really get going. It's already happening, to some extent, with G.Skill leading the way. Earlier this week, for example, G.Skill showboated hitting DDR5-7000 on its Trident Z5 memory, the fastest so far without resorting to exotic cooling. And now it's highlighting a DDR5 world record, obtained while taking a liquid nitrogen bath. Air and liquid nitrogen represent two very different ends of the cooling spectrum. In time, perhaps DDR5-8000 memory kits will become the norm, or at least somewhat common within the enthusiast RAM sector. In the early going, however, it apparently... Read more...
Slowly but surely, memory makers have begun announcing DDR5 memory kits for Intel's Alder Lake platform. Most of them have been relatively modest in speed, at or around DDR5-4800. Meanwhile, G.Skill is doing what it does—focusing on enthusiast kits and seeing how far it can push its own memory products. The best stable result so far without resorting to exotic cooling is DDR5-7000. G.Skill achieved the "extreme speed" result on a 32GB kit of Trident Z5 RGB memory, comprised of a pair of 16GB modules. Equally impressive, it was able to hit DDR5-7000 with relatively tight timings (for the speed), assuming it was using its DDR5-6400 kit that we wrote about a couple weeks ago. That kit qualifies... Read more...
The big news today is Intel's 12th Gen Core Alder Lake launch, which kicked off a bevy of product announcements from various system builders and hardware partners. G.Skill is among them. To avoid getting lost in the noise, G.Skill today came out swinging with a high-end Trident Z5 DDR5-6800 memory kit designed for Alder Lake. For the time being, G.Skill can brag it is offering the "world's fastest DDR5 memory kit," though for how long remains to be seen. Prior to today's Alder Lake launch, memory makers have teased even faster speeds on the horizon, though G.Skill is the first (that we're aware of) for formally debut a DDR5 memory kit with a 6,800 MT/s data rate. "G.Skill is dedicated to develop... Read more...
G.Skill has carved out an enthusiast following for its high-performance memory kits and its efforts within the competitive overclocking community. Not looking to slow things down in the DDR5 era, G.Skill announced several "extreme performance" DDR5 memory kits, culminating in DDR5-6400 with comparatively tight timings (to what we have seen so far). That's relative, of course—part of the trade off with opening up the bandwidth spigot at the DDR5 tap is that the faster transfer rates come at the expense of looser memory timings. Take for example GeIL's recently introduced Polaris RGB Sync memory. At DDR5-4800, timings are set at 40-40-40-77, at 1.1V. The higher you go, the looser things get,... Read more...
The first retail listing for a DDR5 memory kit with RGB lighting has popped up, and in doing so, we have an idea of where preliminary pricing will land. That's the good news. The bad news? It looks like DDR5 memory is not going to be cheap. That is to be expected to some extent when new technology emerges, and on the bright side, this is just a single listing. This new listing is for a 32GB (2x16GB) kit of GeIL Polaris RGB Sync DDR5-4800 memory, with a bright red or gray aluminum heastink and a strip of RGB lighting across the contoured top. The asking price is $349.99. That is definitely on the expensive side compared to DDR4 memory, no doubt to account for the faster transfer rate (4,800 MT/s)... Read more...
Next-generation DDR5 memory is not even out in earnest yet for consumers, but that has not stopped Adata from pursuing overclocking records...with its own RAM, of course. Adata has taken one of its 16GB DDR5 memory kits that is rated to run at 4,800 MT/s, and overclocked it to 8,118 MT/s. Not too shabby, eh? The kudos really belong to Adata's XPG division. Same company, but you can think of XPG being to Adata as Republic of Gamers (ROG) is to ASUS, if that makes sense. That being the case, the press release praises "XGP's know-how and expertise in pushing memory modules to their full potential" with this "record-breaking milestone." That is indeed and boisterous overclock beyond the stock specification.... Read more...
In preparation for the arrival of Intel's upcoming Alder Lake CPUs and Z690 platform, TeamGroup is highlighting a couple of new DDR5 memory products, the T-Force Vulcan and T-Force Delta RGB. They are part of a larger online launch event, in which TeamGroup is unveiling a spate of products, including internal and external SSDs, and even a liquid-cooled SSD. Of course, SSDs have been around for quite some time, but DDR5 memory has been out of the realm of consumer platforms up until this point. That changes this year with Alder Lake. Intel's 12th Gen Core processors and accompanying platforms offer up support for the next-gen memory standard, as well as DDR4 memory. You won't be able to use both... Read more...
Memory makers are not necessarily waiting around for next-gen platforms to arrive before unveiling or releasing DDR5 RAM modules. PNY certainly is not. The company announced it is adding DDR5-4800 memory kits to its lineup "to support the growing lineup of motherboards" that will be compatible with the DDR5 standard. As of right now, there's not a single consumer motherboard or platform that supports DDR5. However, such products are right around the corner, starting with Intel's upcoming Alder Lake launch. Alder Lake is set to be Intel's major push into hybrid (or heterogeneous) computing, and its accompanying 600-series chipset will support next-gen technologies, including DDR5 memory and PCI... Read more...
Intel's upcoming Alder Lake launch will usher in the start of the DDR5 era in the consumer space, and then sometime next year, AMD will hop on board with its Zen 4 lineup. This is going to result in higher bandwidth memory products, with transfers (or 'speed' if you prefer to call it that) starting at 6,400MT/s. The added bandwidth could come at a cost, and not just a monetary one, but also paid for in heat. It is hard to know exactly what to expect just yet, because even though some early DDR5 memory kits landed on Amazon a few weeks ago, they have not arrived in earnest. What we do know, however, are the finalized official specifications laid out by JEDEC, and how DDR5 will differ from DDR4... Read more...
Has there ever been a more difficult time to build or upgrade a PC, in terms of parts availability and cost? Not in recent, that is for sure. Certain parts are difficult to find in stock at MSRP, especially graphics cards, but GPUs are not the only core components that care commanding higher prices these days. DRAM pricing is on the rise too, and is expected to keep going up. Fortunately, if all you need is a kit of DDR4 memory, you can find one easy enough—places like Amazon and Newegg are littered with kits of different capacities and speeds from major players and smaller brands alike. And memory makers continue to crank out new kits. For example, HyperX just recently launched high-speed... Read more...
Do you think memory makers are antsy for next-gen platforms from AMD and Intel to arrive? There is no doubt about it, as evidenced by the suddenly steady stream of DDR5 announcements we are seeing. Geil is the latest the beat its chest over its DDR5 efforts, with the company touting fast kits that exceed JEDEC specifications, in capacities up to 128GB. Let's talk about JEDEC for a moment. Last July, JEDEC released the final specifications for DDR5, noting at the time that initial kits are expected to 4,800MHz. And indeed, we have seen a few announcements hitting those specs already, such as TeamGroup's 16GB DDR5-4800 memory kit. However, JEDEC also left it a bit open-ended, saying DDR5 will deliver... Read more...
Since the launch of Intel's Rocket Lake CPUs, we have seen memory makers pump out increasingly faster RAM kits, with speeds topping 5,000MHz. So it goes with Kingston's gaming division, HyperX, which today announced three new high-speed Predator DDR4 memory kits, with speeds cranked up to a blistering-fast 5,333MHz at the top end. The new high-octane modules sport optimized XMP profiles for Intel's latest chipsets, so you may see the best results when pairing them with a Rocket Lake platform (Z590). However, they are also "compatible with many of AMD's latest chipsets," which typically respond well to higher frequency RAM (up to a certain point, anyway). These new kits include 5,000MHz, 5,133MHz,... Read more...
The era of DDR5 memory has not begun in earnest, but it will later this year when next-gen platforms arrive. In the lead-up to that day, memory makers are hustling their tails off manufacturing and validating DDR5 memory modules. As part of that process, Kingston has sent overclockable DDR5 modules to its motherboard partners so they can begin testing and qualifying the memory on next-gen setups. One of the main benefits of DDR5 compared to DDR4 is more bandwidth. However, it remains to be seen what the DDR5 landscape will look like in the early going. The official specifications laid out by JEDEC, of which Kingston occupies a seat on its board, allow for frequencies of up to 6,400 MT/s. There... Read more...
Memory makers are busy manufacturing DDR5 modules in anticipation of Intel's upcoming Alder Lake launch and AMD's Zen 4 processors. Even though it is still relatively early (Alder Lake is likely releasing towards the end of the year, and Zen 4 in early 2022), the DDR5 announcements are piling up. The latest comes from Asgard, which is owned by Jiahe Jinwei. If the latter sounds familiar, perhaps it is because you visited us here at HotHardware yesterday—we wrote about two Chinese firms announcing DDR5 memory kits, one of which was Jiahe Jinwei (and the other Netac). It's working on both single-sided 16GB and double-sided 32GB DDR5 modules that operate at 4,800MHz and 1.1V. Likewise, the... Read more...
There is not a single consumer platform that supports DDR5 memory at the moment, but that will change by the end of the year, when Intel launches Alder Lake. At that point the DDR5 era will have officially begun. While we wait, however, memory makers are readying DDR5 modules. To that end, two Chinese outfits have both begun mass producing DDR5 memory. One of them is Jiahe Jinwei, which shared some photos of its DDR5 modules (one of which you can see above). The company made quick work of the Micron DDR5 memory chips it received last month, plopping them onto single-sided 16GB and double-sided 32GB modules running at 1.1V. The first DDR5 products from Jiahe Jinwei operate at 4,800MHz. Some extreme... Read more...
It is currently a horrible time to build a new gaming PC. From COVID-19 demand to chip shortages, droughts, and a cryptocurrency boom, many factors make obtaining critical components like high-end processors and graphics cards hard to find at MSRP. Over the weekend, we even heard about the potential for a shortage of SSDs and HDDs due to rising Chinese crypto coin. Today, more bad news is coming in for those looking to build a new rig or upgrade an existing one. Research firm TrendForce projects that DRAM prices will surge between 18 to 23 percent for Q2 2021 versus Q1 2021. The 18 to 23 percent range is for the overall DRAM market, but higher increases are expected for consumer PC DRAM versus... Read more...
The era of DDR5 memory will begin in earnest later this year when Intel releases its Alder Lake-S processors, followed by AMD launching its Zen 4 lineup—both will offer support for the next-generation memory standard. As that day approaches, memory makers are getting their ducks in a row. We've already seen several DDR5 announcements, and Netac is apparently hyping the development of upcoming RAM that can run at a blazing fast 10,000MHz. That's almost twice as fast as the speediest DDR4 kit on the planet, which is TeamGroup's recently announced T-Force Xtreem DDR4-5600MHz memory. Most existing DDR4 kits fall withing the 3000-4000MHz range, with higher speeds typically being reserved for... Read more...
We should count our lucky stars that PC memory pricing is not through the roof, like it was at one point—these days you can find name-brand 16GB DDR4-3200 kits selling for less than $80. That said, general pricing could be going up, right as Intel's new Rocket Lake-S lineup lifts off. Exactly how much remains to be seen. According to a TrendForce report, DRAM pricing crawled upwards by 3-8 percent in the first quarter of 2021. As we head into the second quarter, the market research firm anticipates prices going up a bit more significantly, by another 13-18 percent. To use the example above of an $80 memory kit, a price hike on the higher side could mean paying around $94 for the same RAM... Read more...
Almost all of the chatter centered on DDR5 memory so far has been in reference to full-size modules for future motherboard applications. That is all fine and dandy, especially with Intel set to release its Alder Lake-S lineup later this year, and AMD on track to deliver Zen 4 around the same time. But what about laptops? Those will be getting DDR5 upgrades as well, and Teamgroup is on top of it with a newly developed DDR5 SO-DIMM. "Paying attention to the needs of not only desktop but also notebook and mini PC users, Teamgroup has successfully created a DDR5 SO-DIMM and is expected to be the first to take Intel and AMD's new platform validation tests," the company says. Granted, there are no... Read more...
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