Items tagged with raspberry pi 4

The Raspberry Pi 4 is one of the cheapest single-board computers around, and thanks to its substantial performance boost over its predecessors, it also represents a good bang for the buck if you're interested in learning Linux, or just want to kick back and play some of your favorite retro games in Lakka. The good news is, the latest version of the Raspberry Pi Foundation's Linux distribution, Raspbian Buster, comes with a new firmware revision for the tiny system which removes the previously imposed 2 GHz clock speed limit and loosens restrictions on voltage boosts, so of course we had to take it for a spin and run some tests.  Preparing The Raspberry Pi 4 For OC Action If you're interested... Read more...
Back in June, the Raspberry Pi Foundation announced their newest single-board computer, the Raspberry Pi 4. This tiny PC packs a quad-core Cortex A72 SoC from Broadcom and up to 4 GB of DDR4 memory at a very attractive price. While aimed at emerging markets for folks new to computers, the Pi really caught on with retro gamers and "makers" in general from the start. The latest Pi has a whole lot more computing horsepower than the last iteration, but software support hadn't quite caught up—until just now. The LibRetro team released Lakka version 2.3 with a ton of new features, a retro gaming focus, and perhaps the most important is official support for the Raspberry Pi 4.  Raspberry... Read more...
When it comes to single-board PCs, the Raspberry Pi is by far the most popular device on the market, and has found uses in a number of different market sectors. However, there are also plenty of competitors out there that try to compete with the Raspberry Pi on price, or outdo it with regards to outright performance. The latest challenger to the throne comes from Radxa, which is launching its new Rock Pi X single-board PC. Unlike the newly released Raspberry Pi 4, the Rock Pi X doesn't make use of a quad-core ARM SoC; instead, it uses one of Intel's legacy Atom x5-Z8300 processors (Cherry Trail). This quad-core SoC originally launched over four years ago and has base/boost frequencies... Read more...
The Raspberry Pi 4 launched just a few months ago in late June, and represented the most powerful extension of the single-board PC concept to-date. The performance of the quad-core Broadcom BCM2711 Cortex-A72 SoC means that users can expect an increase in heat generated; especially when the system is overclocked. Although it seems a little comical to think of people overclocking a RPi, there are plenty of enthusiasts out there that need to eke out every last bit of performance for their applications. That's where the Blink Blink ICE Tower Fan comes into play. The cooler features a beefy radiator along with 5mm copper tubes and a 58mm fan. And in what is a bit of an overindulgence for... Read more...
Pine64 has made a name for itself by producing single-board PCs that are competitive with the incredibly Raspberry Pi family. Single-board PCs are well-known not only for their relatively affordable prices, but also their versatility when it comes to empowering new form-factors. Pine64's latest venture is with what it is calling the Pinebook Pro, which is a Linux-based laptop. The Pinebook Pro is said to offer performance comparable to that of the newly released Raspberry Pi 4, and features a hexa-core Rockchip RX3399 ARM64 SoC, 4GB of RAM and a total of 64GB eMMC storage. Given that this is a laptop, we should point out that it has a 14.1-inch IPS display with a resolution of 1920x1080.... Read more...
It is often said that big things come in small packages, and in the early going, that appears to be the case with the Raspberry Pi 4. Some new benchmarks show the latest Raspberry Pi iteration performing really well, especially compared to the previous generation Raspberry Pi 3. While we have yet to spend any hands on time with on, the Raspberry Pi 4 is looking like a proper mini PC. In case you missed it, the Raspberry Pi Foundation introduced the Raspberry Pi 4 a couple of weeks ago with a price tag starting at $35. It is powered by a 64-bit Broadcom BCM2711 quad-core Cortex-A72 processor running at 1.5GHz and can be configured with 1GB, 2GB, or even 4GB of LPDDR4-2400 SDRAM. The latest Raspberry... Read more...
In addition to pulling a new Raspberry Pi 4 from the oven, the Raspberry Pi Foundation has cooked up a brand new version of its Raspberry Pi operating system, called Raspbian Buster. As the name implies, it is based on Buster, the latest version of Debian Linux (and named after the actual dog in Pixar's Toy Story movies). Interestingly, Raspbian Buster is debuting slightly ahead of the official Debian release. The Raspberry Pi Foundation says this is because the open source OpenGL video driver is now being used by default, and it was developed using the most recent version of Debian. "It would have been a lot of work to port everything required for it back on to Raspbian Stretch, so we decided... Read more...
One of the first products to sport a brand-spanking-new Raspberry Pi 4 is the pi-top [4], a new flagship product by pi-top, a "creative learning" company based in London. The pi-top [4] is described as a "go-anywhere computer" with relatively powerful hardware for creators and makers to leverage in a variety of ways. "Quite simply, the Raspberry Pi 4 makes pi-top [4] the most powerful and connected tool available to creators. Just as affordable technology allowed musicians to create platinum-selling records from their bedroom in the 1980s, pi-top [4] will catalyze new creations from rockstar inventors," said Graham Brown-Martin, chief education and product officer at pi-top. A Raspberry Pi 4... Read more...
Last November the refreshed Raspberry Pi 3 Model A+ developer board landed on the market with a price tag of $25. A new version of the developer board has debuted called the Raspberry Pi 4 starting at $35. The Raspberry Pi 4 brings with it improved performance and more connectivity along withdual Micro HDMI ports supporting up to two 4K displays. Raspberry Pi 4 is powered by a Broadcom BCM2711 quad-core Cortex-A72 64-bit unit running at 1.5GHz. The Pi 4 can be fitted with 1GB, 2GB, or 4GB of LPDDR4-2400 SDRAM. Both 2.4GHz and 5.0GHz 802.11ac WiFi is supported along with Bluetooth 5.0 BLE. Wired connectivity support includes a gigabit Ethernet port, and the board has a pair of USB 3.0 ports... Read more...
We first got a glimpse of the Raspberry Pi 3 thanks to an FCC filing, but now Raspberry Pi has officially lifted the veil on its latest mini PC. And today is not a special day just because of the Raspberry Pi 3; it also marks four years exactly since the original 256MB Raspberry Pi Model B was introduced. The Raspberry Pi 3 is fully compatible with the first and second generation models, but brings with it a 1.2GHz 64-bit quad-core processor (it offers roughly ten times the computing performance of the original Raspberry Pi). More importantly, the new Cortex-A53-based processor is between 50 to 60 percent faster than the Raspberry Pi 2. On the functionality front, 802.11n Wi-Fi and Bluetooth... Read more...