Items tagged with security

You may have heard of Schlage. It's a well-known company in the lock industry, and you've likely seen at least one Schlage lock in a door somewhere. Well, they've just launched Schlage LiNK, a suite of products that encompasses not just security, as in an alarm system, but a control system for your locks and a monitoring system for the house. While we've had a burglar alarm in our house for as long as we've owned it, this goes both a step beyond that, and not quite as far. Using Z-Wave technology, the system allows you to remotely control much of your house. Of course, there are many DIY systems and ready-made system that do this, but Schlage is hoping their name will be a key selling point.... Read more...
Oops, they hacked Twitter again.  Yep, in a breach totally separate from the phishing scam from last weekend, Twitter has been hacked.  And not just any account, either.  We're talking about the accounts of none other than the President-elect (which had been idle since the election), Britney Spears, Fox News, and a lot more.In total, according to Twitter, 33 high-profile accounts were hacked.  The explanation?  Support tools that are supposed to be used in case a user forgets a password or some other dire emergency were hacked into. What Happened? The issue with these 33 accounts is different from the Phishing scam aimed at Twitter users this weekend. These accounts were... Read more...
A phishing scam, in 140 characters or less? That's what we have here, as a phishing scam apparently hit Twitter on Saturday. According to Twitter, If you receive an email notice saying you’ve received a Direct Message with a link that redirects to what seems like Twitter.com, be careful about entering your Twitter credentials. Instead, look closely at the URL to see if it’s not really Twitter but a sketchy phishing site like https://twitter.access-logins.com. If this has you feeling a bit weirded out, feel free to change your Twitter password. If you get the direct message in question, you'll get a message like the following, which Chris Pirillo received. hey! check out this funny blog about... Read more...
As Mozilla’s Firefox, Google’s Chrome, Microsoft’s Internet Explorer, and Apple’s Safari all compete against one another to try to see who can be the No. 1 Web browser, certainly privacy is a key factor that influences success. While many of us hope to never have to deal with the repercussions of a flawed browser and/or stolen information, there are no guarantees. As a result, we must all realize surfing the Web is a bit of a gamble, though often times it’s a very small one. Being informed of the latest threats and flaws is key to making an informed decision about which browser to use. Kate McKinley, a researcher at San Francisco security firm iSec Partners, recently took a closer look into the... Read more...
A recent discovery of an exploit of the MD5 algorithm used to check the validity of Secure Sockets Layer SSL certificates (The little lock icon on the bottom right of your browser) may put to question whether your online transaction is in fact valid and secure.CNET reports that an international team of researchers will announce this today.They plan to demonstrate how to forge security certificates used by secure Web sites, a process that would allow a sufficiently sophisticated criminal to fool the built-in verification methods used by all modern Web browsers--without the user being alerted that anything was amiss.The problem is unlikely to affect most Internet users in the near future because... Read more...
Digital photo frames are a hot gift item these days, but anyone buying a Samsung SPF-85H 8-inch digital photo frame through Amazon.com this year may have given their loved ones a little something extra: A computer virus.Amazon reached out to its purchasers with a note just before the holiday.Here's a snippet of their warning to customers: The alert concerns discovery of the W32.Sality.AE worm on the installation disc SAMSUNG FRAME MANAGER XP VERSION 1.08, which is needed for using the SPF-85H as a USB monitor. If you are using Vista or a different version of Frame Manager, this issue does not affect you. It goes on with step-by-step instructions on what to do if you are affected. Basically, users... Read more...
TRENDnet, a best-in-class wired and wireless networking hardware brand, today announces the launch of the first-to-market 7” Wireless Internet Camera and Photo Monitor, model TV-M7. The world’s first 7” Wireless Internet Camera and Photo Monitor connects to your wireless network, detects wired and wireless TRENDnet Internet Security Cameras and streams camera video wirelessly in real-time. It also acts like a photo frame—it displays photo slideshows and plays personal videos and music. Users previously needed a computer to view streaming video from Internet security cameras, with the TV-M7 users can view video while their computer is turned off. The device also enables users to monitor up to... Read more...
Lavasoft, developer of the long-time entrant in the spyware detection arena, Ad-Aware, has released a stand-alone antivirus application. The new product, Lavasoft Anti-Virus Helix is based on technology from antivirus vendor Avira. It's interesting that Lavasoft would make this move shortly after Microsoft's announcement to drop OneCare and replace it with a simplified free product in the second half of next year. Additionally, the AV market is rather crowded, though obviously, the development of this product was long underway prior to the Microsoft announcement. Pricing is reasonable, with a 1 year license for $23.95. Multi-year and multi-PC licenses are available as well. Right now they also... Read more...
Ericsson and Intel have announced that they are collaborating on a way to keep your laptop's contents safe when your laptop goes MIA. Using Intel's Anti-Theft Technology - PC Protection (Intel AT-p) and Ericsson's Mobile Broadband (HSPA) modules, lost or stolen laptops cans be remotely "locked."Similar to Lenovo's recently announced Lockdown Now PC technology, the Ericsson-Intel technology uses SMS messages sent directly to a laptop's mobile broadband chip. Once the chip receives the lock-down message, it passes it to the Intel AT-p function, which is integrated into Intel's Centrino 2 with vPro technology platform."When a loss or theft is detected, Intel Anti-Theft PC Protection technology can... Read more...
Malware writers sobbed Tuesday as Microsoft announced that it will cease sales of its security product, Windows Live OneCare, as of June 30th, 2009. Instead, Microsoft announced that it would begin shipping a free product, codenamed "Morro," in the second half of 2009. The new offering will be less of a resource hog, according to the press release, which would obviously enable Microsoft to protect PCs in developing nations more effectively. In other words, they want to make sure they have some sort of product covering all the security holes in their OSes. But seriously, let's face it, the product never really gained a large market share, as it was buggy and performed poorly in various antivirus... Read more...
Traditional antivirus (AV) testing, such as that done by organizations such as AV-test.org and AV-comparatives.org, uses collections of malware to demonstrate the capabilities of security products. Secunia, on the other hand, focuses on exploits. For example, it has a scanner at its site that will search your system for unpatched vulnerabilities in products such as Microsoft Windows, Internet Explorer, or Firefox. As Secunia's focus is on exploits, you might expect them to try to put AV solutjions to the test with exploits, rather than just already published malware, and that's what they did. They did a study (.PDF) by taking the following security suites: McAfee Internet Security Suite 2009Norton... Read more...
Data breaches are becoming increasingly common and more sophisticated, putting consumers' personal information and financials at risk. Not only can these data breaches lead to identity theft, but some can even lead to money being siphoned out of bank accounts and illegal purchases made on credit cards. The responsibility for preventing these breaches falls on many shoulders, including merchants, consumers, and even Internet service providers (ISPs). Once such ISP, Verizon, recently analyzed "four years of data from over 500 cases worked by the Verizon Business Investigative Response team," to produce a report that gives an in-depth look into how data breaches are occurring in four major industry... Read more...
The security vulnerabilities already discovered in Chrome appear to have been patched by Google. Of course, Google (much like Apple) hasn't provided any release notes, so discovering what's been fixed isn't that easy. Google said, in a group post: We're planning to do release notes. 149.29 is a security update and we released it as fast as we could. We would've liked more time to prepare things, but some of the vulnerabilities were made public without giving us a chance to respond, update, and protect our users first. Thanks for being patient as we work out the kinks in all of our processes, Mark Larson Program Manager for Google Chrome It seems that the "carpet bombing" flaw created by using... Read more...
If you use a computer on a regular basis, chances are you are running some sort of anti-malware application. If you aren't then you really should be, as recent studies show that malware is becoming more pervasive and more sophisticated. No operating system (OS) is immune from malware attacks, but Microsoft Windows is the most frequently targeted OS. In an effort to help guide Windows users as to what are the better anti-malware options available, AV-Test just released performance results from 34 of the most recently-available versions of security suites--including a number of 2009 and beta versions as well.  One of the primary expectations of a software security suite is that it will effectively... Read more...
Apparently, Linux kernel creator, Linus Torvalds has no problem expressing his opinion, and did so vehemently via back-and-forth e-mails with the editors of Network World this week. What got Torvalds so heated is his perception of how security vulnerabilities are so incredibly over-hyped to the extent that he calls it a "security circus." What started this whole tirade, was a post Torvalds made to the Linux kernel developer newsgroup four weeks ago where he lobbed his opinions of how the "security circus... glorifies and... encourages the wrong behavior," and where he saved his cruelest and most politically-incorrect statement for the uber-security-minded, OpenBSD developers: Linus Torvalds... Read more...
It used to be fairly straightforward choosing a browser. Internet Explorer came bundled with everything, a few hardy souls got on the Firefox bandwagon early, Apple freaks used Safari, and Ron Paul voters used Opera. Since hackers concentrated their attention on the target-rich environment of massed IE users, everybody else benefited from "security by obscurity." No more, it seems. Bad people are finally wising up to the fact that lots of people are using non-Microsoft browsers now. Enough to make it worth stealing from them -- or annoying them, anyway.Case in point: We have no IE bugs to report this month, but both Firefox and Safari have been hit hard.So forget the idea that just because you've... Read more...
Microsoft Releases Latest Microsoft Security Intelligence Report Company finds use of malicious software increasingly motivated by financial gain. LONDON - Microsoft Corp. today released the fourth volume of its Microsoft Security Intelligence Report (SIR) at Infosecurity Europe 2008. The report focuses on the second half of 2007 and uses data derived from a range of tools running on approximately 450 million computers worldwide to provide an in-depth, global view of software vulnerabilities, software exploits, malicious software and potentially unwanted software. The latest SIR shows the fewest number of security vulnerability disclosures across the software industry since the second half of... Read more...
A report released Wednesday by Infosecurity Europe revealed that not only is chocolate good bait for getting someone's password, so is an attractive appearance.576 office workers in total were polled by the fake researchers in a bid to raise awareness about information security.  Infosecurity Europe hired attractive “researchers” to hand out surveys at the train station.  Those that completed the survey received a chocolate candy bar.  Seems like a decent deal to me!The same group performed a similar survey in previous years and the results seem to be improving.  Back in 2007, 64% of those polled gave up their passwords but only 21% this year did so.  However 61% still... Read more...
The British company Thruvision has announced the T5000 Security Imaging System, a camera that can "see" under clothes using what the company calls "passive imaging technology" to identify objects by the natural electromagnetic rays that they emit. The T5000 camera, created by a company called ThruVision, uses what it calls "passive imaging technology" to identify objects by the natural electromagnetic rays--known as Terahertz or T-rays--that they emit. The high-powered camera can detect hidden objects from up to 80 feet away and is effective even when people are moving. It does not reveal physical body details and the screening is harmless, the company says. The technology, which has military... Read more...
Well, although there's likely a security hole there somewhere, the WSJ Online has accepted Facebook's friend request with the "Seen This?" feature.Hoping to tap into the growing buzz of online social networks, the Journal is adding a feature to its Web site that will allow readers to see which Journal stories are popular among that user's Facebook friends. The feature, which goes live early Wednesday morning, is called "SeenThis?" and is powered by a company called Loomia Inc. Financial terms weren't disclosed.This is the WSJ's Online second foray into friendship.  Remember they teamed with Digg earlier?... Read more...
Could anything else possibly fit the word "ironic" better than this?Part of security software vendor CA's Web site was hacked earlier this week and was redirecting visitors to a malicious Web site hosted in China.Although the problem now appears to have been corrected, cached versions of some pages in the press section of CA.com show that earlier this week the site had been redirecting visitors to the uc8010.com domain, which has been serving malicious software since late December, according to Marcus Sachs, director of the SANS Internet Storm Center.No comment from CA in the story, so it's unknown if they were using their own products to protect the site or not.... Read more...
Yep, not only did the PlayStation 3 get a firmware upgrade today (to 2.0), part of that upgrade includes what Trend Micro says is the first product of its kind for a gaming console.Trend's service is available as part of Sony's 2.00 firmware update for the PS3, also released on Thursday. The service will initially be free for users through April 2008, but Trend has not yet released future pricing, said Keith Reed, Trend's online manager for Europe.Gaming systems are increasingly accessing the Internet, to download new games or for Web browsing, which potentially expose the machines to the same kind of threats as desktop PCs, Reed said. That's right, make it free at first, suck 'em in, and then... Read more...
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