Items tagged with Technology

Intel landed itself on the top spot of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) new list of companies using the most renewable energy to power their business. According to the list, the Santa Clara chip maker uses more than 2.5 billion kilowatt hours of renewable energy sourced from solar, geothermal, low impact hydro, and biomass sources to power 88 percent of its operations. "Our renewable purchase is just one part of a multi-faceted approach to protect the environment, and one that we hope spurs additional development and demand for renewable energy," Intel Presidenta nd CEO Paul Otellini said. Source: EPA Intel's focus on green energy has the environmental impact of taking more... Read more...
Abbot confused the tar out of Costello when he tried to explain Who's on first, and while the ambiguity surrounding the 'Super Wi-Fi' moniker isn't on the same level of stupid hilarity, the Wi-Fi Alliance nonetheless feels consumers will end up equally confused. Super Wi-Fi, after all, isn't Wi-Fi at all, it's unlicensed spectrum known as Television White Spaces to expand connectivity. "The Wi-Fi Alliance supports efforts to use the unlicensed spectrum known as Television White Spaces to expand connectivity. However, there is currently no Wi-Fi technology that operates in this spectrum," said Wi-Fi Alliance Marketing Director Kelly Davis-Felner. "It is important that users not be misled into... Read more...
Texas Instruments, maker of the popular OMAP processor line and those pricey calculators high school math teachers insist their students bring to class, announced fourth quarter revenue of $3.42 billion, net income of $298 billion, and earnings per share of 25 cents, all of which exceeded the company's expectations. "Revenue in the fourth quarter was higher than expected across all our major product lines, reinforcing our belief that we're at the bottom of this downturn. I'm pleased to say that despite the downturn and the lower factory utilization that came with it, cash flow from operations was strong and well above levels as compared with similar points in prior downturns. Our strategic focus... Read more...
We don't want to go so far as to call the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas the Rocky Balboa of technology conventions, but let's face it, there's a bit of uncertainty in regards to its longevity. In the past few years, CES didn't seem to bustle to the same extent it once did, and the gut punch this year came when Microsoft announced this would be the last time it would have a major presence at the show, giving up its floor space and not committing to future keynotes. Is CES done for? Not quite. As it turns out, CES 2012 was the largest in the event's 44 year history with a record number of more than 3,100 exhibitors across the largest show floor the convention has ever had -- 1.861 million... Read more...
It takes money to make money, and it takes it a whole bunch of cash to make semiconductors. Case in point: Samsung is reportedly holding a massive debt sale in which it will sell about $1 billion in bonds to fund its chip plant operations in the U.S. It's the first major overseas debt sale for Samsung in over 10 years, Reuters reports. Among other things, Samsung supplies semiconductor chips to Apple for its iPhone and iPad tablet PC devices, and by selling 5-year bonds, the company could ensure it has enough funds to keep its Austin, Texas plant firing on all cylinders. Samsung is hoping to secure additional funds for operations in its manufacturing facility in Austin, Texas. Samsung isn't exactly... Read more...
Microsoft made a surprise announcement a couple of weeks ago when it informed the tech world that the 2012 Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas would be the last one in which the Redmond software giant gives a keynote or rents floor space. The company is pulling out after this year, at least as far as major presence goes, a decision it made based on the fact that CES doesn't align with its own product announcement schedule. Is the show dead? Not exactly. CNet claims to have heard from "a source close to the conference" that Microsoft's floor space sold in a mere 45 minutes. It was snatched up by a Dish and Chinese electronics maker called Hisense, which reportedly agreed to pay the same amount... Read more...
Conspiracy theorists will have you believe the reason why Intel is taking so long to natively support the SuperSpeed USB 3.0 transfer spec is because the Santa Clara chip maker is much more interested in promoting its Thunderbolt technology. The only problem with that theory (well, one of several, actually) is that Thunderbolt is still exclusive to Apple, and if Intel's master plan was to bury USB, wouldn't it make sense to release a version for Windows PCs? Get ready for more conspiracy theories. According to reports, Intel is telling its hardware partners that it will rain down its Thunderbolt technology on the Windows PC market in April 2012, news of which prompted several first-tier PC makers... Read more...
Everyone's been kvelling over Siri since the iPhone 4GS was released a month ago. But Apple's "virtual personal assistant" is just the natural evolution of technology being built around our needs, wants and desires. That's exactly why so much popular science fiction has been written around the idea that one day robots will tire of being our slaves and will rise up and rebel. "Terminator," "I, Robot," "Battlestar Galactica" (the new version) all show us what happens. So don't be surprised when Siri starts trying to boss you around. It's interesting, though, because early technology was primarily introduced in an effort to get more work out of us. By making us more productive, more could get done.... Read more...
We'd sprinkle salt on ice cream if we thought it would improve the flavor the way it does with almost everything else on the planet. The fact that table salt isn't a food group does nothing to diminish our affection for this essential ingredient (sorry, doc), but did you know it also makes hard drives better? As trippy as that sounds, Dr. Joel Yang from the Institute of Materials Research and Engineering (IMRE), a research institute of Singapore's Agency of Science, Technology, and Research (A*STAR), along with collaborators from the National University of Singapore (NUS) and the Data Storage Institute (DSI), came up with a way to increase HDD capacities six-fold using sodium chloride, the chemical... Read more...
There aren't many competitions where the one that sucks the best is considered the winner, and even less that are fit for print on a family friendly technology website. But we're talking about vacuums here, so we're in the clear. We know that's going to disappoint some of you who were hoping for...something else, but get over it and read on, because Toshiba's Smarbo is one cool piece of tech. Details are a little fuzzy since we're going off a translated press release written in Japanese, but what's crystal clear is Toshiba's Smarbo is a self-propelled vacuum cleaner similar in style to the popular Roomba robot, only Toshiba's version wields two CPUs. That gives the Smarbo double the brain power,... Read more...
For those of you keeping score, China just leapfrogged over the United States to become the largest PC market in the world, according to data by market research firm IDC. The latest figures peg China accounting for 18.5 million units worth $11.9 billion shipped in the second quarter of 2011, enough to edge out the United States, which received 17.7 million units worth $11.7 billion. China now holds a 22 percent of the PC market, compared to the U.S. at 21 percent. Does it really matter? "China's lead in the PC market is a huge shift that reflects the rising fortunes of emerging markets as well as the relative stagnation of more mature regions," said Loren Loverde, Program Vice President, Worldwide... Read more...
It seems that devices keep getting thinner and thinner, which makes us think about just how thin our smartphones and other devices can really get. If a development by engineers at Queen's University Human Media Lab is any indication, our future phones may be a lot thinner than you might think. The engineers have created a "PaperPhone." As you might assume from its name, this slim smartphone is so thin that it's almost like paper. In fact, it can even bend like paper, and you actually control the phone by bending the device. The PaperPhone can memorize bend points and directions and will respond with different actions depending on how you bend the phone. The developers hope the technology could... Read more...
Now's not a fun time to be working at Panasonic, not when you're constantly looking over your shoulder wondering if the corporate axe will come crashing down. Over the next two years, Panasonic said it plans to hand out another 17,000 pink slips and turn out the lights at up to 70 factories in order to trim costs and remain competitive. This comes after Panasonic already slashed 18,000 jobs in the past year, which will bring the overall tally to 35,000 when the higher ups are finished showing workers the exit door, presumably (and hopefully) with severance pay in hand. "The figure is huge, but so is the company, and for an old-fashioned one like Panasonic, this is a big move," said Toru Hashizume,... Read more...
Sorry humans, but it's time to welcome your new robot overlords. After last night's airing of Jeopardy, it's only a matter of time before our gadgets turn against us, perhaps led by Watson or some other equally intelligent creation. You see, Watson is the name given to IBM's supercomputer, which proved both faster and smarter than the two most decorated Jeopardy champions of all time. Watson, which is much too large to fit behind a podium, was represented by an avatar and fed the questions via text. This occurred at the same time Jeopardy host Alex Trebek read the questions out loud to Ken Jennings, who hold's Jeopardy's longest win streak ever at 74 games, and Brad Rutter, whose more than $3.2... Read more...
No rest for the weary, right? You can apply that saying to Intel, the world's largest chip maker, who upon closing out 2010 is eager to ring in the new year. And who can blame them? With Sandy Bridge just around the corner, 2011 could shape up to be Intel's busiest year yet. Intel spent much of 2010 milking its Atom processor line, and you can bet Sandy Bridge will dominate Intel's rhetoric in early 2011. But what else does the No. 1 chip maker have in store? For starters, look for Intel to target mobile and cloud security, the result of a $7.68 billion acquisition of McAfee. In the company's annual "Year in Review" fact sheet (PDF), Intel puts a lot of focus on mobile and wireless technology,... Read more...
Are you pretty good with technology? Do you hate the holidays due to your parents and relatives always asking you for tech advice? You probably aren't alone! Google has created a new website that aims to point these "simple" Q&A sessions to a more prominent portal, hopefully easing the sting and helping your not-so-tech-savvy relatives out at the same time. Teach Parents Tech is a great new site where tech-savvy individuals can send how-to videos to their moms, dads, uncles, etc. in order to help them do simple things like check their email on a phone or use tabs on a web browser. These are things that younger folks tend to take for granted, but many parents just aren't aware of. Why not... Read more...
The next time you walk down the street and see some suit spazzing out, don't assume he's crazy (unless he's foaming at the mouth), maybe he's just recharging his digital camera, or any other electronic device that uses AA or AAA batteries. That's because the eggheads at Brother Industries Ltd. have put together vibration-powered generators capable of giving the company's prototype batteries a shot of juice when shaken. "The new generator will semi-permanently eliminate the need to replace batteries and contribute to reducing the amount of wastes," Brother Industries explains. Brother Industries' AA-size prototype with the generator and rechargeable battery installed in different cases. In their... Read more...
Comedians often make cracks at banks for including Braille on drive-through ATMs (there are number of valid reasons why they do this), but given the progress made by researchers at The National Federation of the Blind and Virginia Tech, don't assume that the driver in front of you isn't actually visually impaired. While it may seem an unlikely scenario, the researchers are ever closer to developing a car for the blind, and in fact plan to demonstrate a prototype vehicle next year that will help those who can't see be able to drive. That's because it will come equipped with technology called "nonvisual interfaces," which use sensors to help a blind driver weave in and out of traffic and other... Read more...
There's great news all around coming from the Consumer Electronics Association, which has just published an annual report on American spending in the world of consumer electronics. Without a doubt, 2009 was a rough year for most, and while technology didn't suffer too bad in the grand scheme of things, pains were still felt. Many experts assumed that 2010 would be the start of a real spending turnaround, and according to these figures, that's exactly what is happening. According to the CEA, the average U.S. household spent $1,380 on consumer electronics (CE) products in the past 12 months, an increase of $151 from last year. The average household spent 12 percent more on CE devices in the past... Read more...
We closed out last year by telling you exactly what we thought were the best offerings to emerge during the final year of the first decade post-Y2K, and you could probably tell (particularly in the netbook sector) that we were somewhat let down by how far we'd come. Or, we should say, how far we haven't come. A new survey by the Zogby recently polled thousands of Americans in order to find out how impressed (or unimpressed) they were with the amount of technological advancements in the past decade. Back in the '80s, we all assumed we'd be whisking to work in flying cars and and the like by the year 2000, and yet, in 2010, many of the ways of life that we were used to back then remain the same... Read more...
Not that CES (the Consumer Electronics Show) really needs any additional hype, but the Consumer Electronics Association (CEA) wants to make sure that even with CES half a year away, that the media and analysts never forget that their technology extravaganza is on the horizon. The CEA sponsored a mini tradeshow in New York City this last week, called the CEA LineShows.We decided that this would be a good opportunity to not only potentially learn about new products and technologies, but it would also be great real-world test for the Flip UltraHD pocket camcorder we recently reviewed. So we grabbed the camcorder and headed over to the show. All Takes Shot On Flip UltraHD Camcorder We spoke with... Read more...
We've always been somewhat skeptical of these so-called "surveys." With the proliferation of the Internet, it's pretty easy to fetch any kind of results you could ever want, but we tend to feel that these findings are at least somewhat substantiated. As part of a new 'Women & Digital Life' study, researchers found that Apple was the most popular technology brand in America amongst the ladies. Surprised? We doubt it.The results showed that Apple took the top spot, with Sony, Microsoft, Dell and HP following closely behind. And really, we can totally see why Apple and Sony would be ranked so highly. Both outfits choose to spend heavily on design and marketing, and so it follows logic that consumers... Read more...
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