Items tagged with tpm 2.0

Could it be true that even Microsoft is not a fan of its strict requirements for installing Windows 11? Namely its insistence that eligible PCs support Trusted Platform Module (TPM) 2.0, and have a processor that falls within its list of compatible chips from AMD and Intel? It's probably (definitely) not true, but even so, Microsoft has done users a solid by providing a registry hack that will get Windows 11 up and running on some PCs that don't make the cut. As we noted in our article on how to get your PC ready for Windows 11, the first order of business is to download and run Microsoft's PC Health Check app. This performs a super-quick audit of your system to see if it meets the requirements.... Read more...
When Microsoft first announced Windows 11 back in late June, many of its design changes and features were welcomed by enthusiasts. However, a lot of controversy brewed over the system requirements for the operating system, particularly with the mandatory support for Ryzen 2000/8th generation Core processors and TPM 2.0. With the launch of Window 11 taking place today, Microsoft is providing some background on why it has taken such a hardline stance on TPM 2.0 and Virtualization-Based Security (VBS), the latter of which we recently discussed regarding its negative effect on PC gaming performance. David Weston, Microsoft director of OS and enterprise security, spoke with CRN about the company's... Read more...
It's no secret that Microsoft ramped up its baseline hardware requirements for Windows 11 compared to Windows 10. However, a large swath of the PC population is being left out by requiring AMD Ryzen 2000 and 8th generation Intel Core (and newer) processors and mandatory TPM 2.0 support. These steep requirements are readily apparent in the enterprise market, as a new survey by Lansweeper shows that over half of workstations in operation today are ineligible for the free upgrade to Windows 11. This data is based on an estimated 30 million Windows devices used across 60,000 organizations. For those that need a refresher, here's what Microsoft lists for Windows 11's minimum system requirements: Processor:... Read more...
For some, Microsoft's insistence that PCs be equipped with Trusted Platform Module (TPM) 2.0 support is irritating, especially since the company has done a poor job explaining why it is suddenly such a big deal. Installing a virtual machine (VM) won't necessarily escape the requirement, either. As users in the Windows Insider program have discovered, the latest preview build in the beta channel—version 22000.194—enforces the TPM 2.0 requirement. Applying the latest cumulative update in Windows 11 bumps the OS up to the latest preview build. Up to this point, VMs have been able to test Insider builds without issue related to the TPM 2.0 requirement. But hey, today is a new day, and... Read more...
Microsoft may have needlessly stressed a lot of people out when it released its PC Health Check app, which was designed to help determine a system's compatibility for running Windows 11. Seemingly capable PCs could (and did) fail the test because of a Trusted Module Platform (TPM 2.0) requirement, even though in many cases, it just boils down to a simple BIOS setting. And to that end, several motherboard makers have responded to the situation by announcing which models support Windows 11. There are a lot that do (more on that in a moment). TPM is an added layer of security, and Microsoft has decided to require it for Windows 11. There are dedicated TPM chips you can install on some motherboards,... Read more...
The pending release of the next generation of Windows is not without a bit of controversy. Microsoft has been receiving some backlash for requiring that PCs embrace the latest Trusted Platform Module (TPM) 2.0 technology in order to run Windows 11, which not everyone is happy about. As it turns out, however, there will actually be some exceptions to the rule. What's the big deal with TPM, anyway? It is an added layer of security at the hardware level, provided either by an actual TPM chip on the motherboard, or baked into the central processing unit (CPU). Intel, for example, has been implementing TPM into its CPUs since its Haswell chips, which were released back in 2013. By default, most motherboards... Read more...